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January 14, 2012
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Lal Bahadur by LindelCaine Lal Bahadur by LindelCaine
"I've never seen anyone who looks like you before, with your hair the colour of rice at harvest time. You are wearing a good jacket,- with so many pockets,- that's a fine jacket. ... and what is that thing you hold in your hands ? CAM-ER-A ? A Camera ?

Yes, I've seen photos, there were two on the wall of a relative's home, in a village three days walk from here. The photos were of some of their family who now live in Kathmandu. No, I've never been to the city. I've walked far in these mountains and I've heard about the city and roads, buses and other things but I've never seen them. Others from my family have been to the city, but not me. I have all I need here, this village is my home, I'm happy here. I looked at those two photos for a long time, because I couldn't understand what they were. My relatives tried to explain them to me, but I wondered how they came to be. So, now I see, that is the tool that makes them,- a cam-er-a you say ?

It's very cold tonight. I'm and old man, my body aches. The cold didn't feel so bad when I was young, working in the fields all day and strong, but now, ... well, I still tend the fields and the animals, but it's getting harder for me with each passing winter. My children and grandchildren do most of the work now, ah well, that's how life goes, doesn't it ?

Our home is simple. We have only firelight in the dark hours. Our fire is small because wood is hard to find these days, it wasn't so before. Come, sit by the fire and I will speak of how life was here when I was younger and could you tell me of your country, your life, your cam-er-a."

* * * * *

In a mountain village, Nepal.

A retrospective image. 100 ASA Fujichrome FILM.

© Copyright 1994-2013 Lindel Caine. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be reproduced, printed or used in any way or form without my written permission. This image may not be transmitted, uploaded to or posted on sites or blogs other than deviantart.com. Please respect this statement and Protect Creative Copyright.

Edit, October,11,2013 : Hello my friends, as I work with an old computer and have only recently seen the difference between the color of my screen and how an image looks on modern screens, I am reposting some of my images while I've access to a newer screen, with edited images in colors and tones as close as possible to the original film image. I hope you like the improvement, I'm sorry that you've not been seeing images as they should be seen. ... wishing you days filled with smiles, my friends. ♡
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2013
Thank you for the honour. :rose:
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:iconmartaraff:
martaraff Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2013
*:sun:*
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:iconnattygrego:
Nattygrego Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
simply beautiful...... thanks a lot for this piece of dream
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2012
Thank you for your kind words. :rose:

... piece of a dream,... yet it was absolute reality.
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:icondougnz:
DougNZ Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012
Absolutely beautiful Lindel! :clap:
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2012
Special in my memories, Doug. I was working on an assignment at the time. In the evenings I would be invited to visit with villagers from time to time and this was one of those moments at the end of a long day, when I was welcomed, tired, cold, still carrying my equipment and wearing my photo-jacket, into this family's home. :rose:
Reply
:icondougnz:
DougNZ Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2012
Wonderful memories. And it's often those who have nothing that welcome you into their homes with warmth and share with you. Nice exposure for slide film, it's usually so unforgiving!
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2012
About Fujchrome slide film, I always deliberately underexposed the film by about half a stop, (depending on the situation). There was no Kodachrome processing in Nepal and it was only possible to purchase Fujichrome or Kodak Ectachrome slide film, for Pro. work,- I preferred the colour and the "look" of Fujichrome film. With Fujichrome, I found that by underexposing, there was much more detail to be found, stronger, potent colour (the colours of Aisa! The vibrant colours of life that surrounded me.) and images had more contrast, when published.

In the case of this moment,- After speaking with the old gentleman and his family for some time, he beckoned me to sit by the fire. You can see by his expression, that I, my photo-jacket (which bulged with cameras, lenses and rolls of film) and equipment, was quite a new thing for him to see.

Lal Bahadur looked so wonderful in the firelight and, as he was interested in my camera and understanding how photos came to be, I asked could I take his photo. He agreed, but was surprised and in wonder as I pointed the lens at him. Steadying the camera with elbows on knees, I exposed for the bright areas, just one "click" then took off my jacket and put the camera away and shared a hot cup of tea and conversation with this soft spoken old man and his family.

I was working on photography relating to conservation, deforestation and reaforestation, with village people in the mountains of Nepal, at the time.
Reply
:icondougnz:
DougNZ Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2012
That's very interesting Lindel, I see you're a writer as well as a photographer :)
I have a lots of old Kodachrome slides, some of which are overexposed. I thought they were junk but kept them and am amazed at how you can bring them back to life in Photoshop.
Lovely story and photo!
Reply
:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2012
In the past, I often collaborated on the writing of articles etc. as well as the Photography. I always did a fair amount of research as preparation for photo-work as well. These days, as my physical activities are a little limited, I wish to write very much, but as I have pain when typing, I strive to have a more modern computer so that I may have voice recognition software. Then, I sincerely hope I can "write" and share many stories of the people and some of the life that I've known.

Yes, I would imagine, with Kodachrome quality and lack of grain, you must be able find much to be rejuvenated with the tools of Photoshop.

As my Fujichrome work is digitally scanned with an eight year old home scanner, there is often grain that is not there when the images are printed, somehow, digital scanning articulates the grain. To minimize this, after scanning, I sharpen the images I'm posting here at dA by hand, just the details, still there's grain, but it's the best I can do for now.

I'm glad you like Lal Bahadur and a little of his story, Doug.:rose:
Reply
:icondougnz:
DougNZ Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2012
I hesitate to chat now as it's painful for you tp reply, but...what is the spec of your comp? If you have MS Vista there a freeware speech-to-text software [link] also a brower based one, though you need to install Google Chrome then go to www.talktyper.com
I use Imagenomic's Noiseware Pro to get rid of grain, it does a great job. I think there is a freeware stand alone version, but it can be a bit hard to find.
The other thing would be to record your voice and email it or upload to some site like [link] and get someone to transcribe it. I'm sure there would be plenty of people on dA that would love to help :)
Reply
:iconjulieswansculpture:
JulieSwanSculpture Featured By Owner May 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for sharing this beautiful image and for taking the time to record this man's expression. The intensity and honesty of the moment has been captured perfectly.
Reply
:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2012
Thank you for your kind words. :rose:
He was a lovely man. Possibly, you may find the words below the image interesting also.
Reply
:icondaxusx:
daxusx Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2012
outstanding!!
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012
:rose:
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:icondaxusx:
daxusx Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012
:iconheartflower:
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:iconmarkus43:
Markus43 Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes Mayalin, contentment and happiness are both choices of the heart, not necessarily effected by circumstance.
A testimony that should be shared with the world.
well done
Reply
:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012
Yes, I agree with you about contentment and happiness and for the most part, so would have Lal Bahadur. However, his life and many others in Nepal, knew/knows much suffering. I do not idealise living in hardship,- lives that are a constant struggle to just survive and trying to alleviate their poverty,- though I do admire and respect those who can make the best of life,- no matter what befalls them,- though this is often not an easy thing to do.

To understand a little more of life as it is for the majority of people in Nepal you could also read my reply to Stroody, on this page.
Reply
:iconmarkus43:
Markus43 Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Maya, your love for Nepal is so evident, so yes, the name Mayalin is fitting.
Thank you for reminding me of the wealth so many of us enjoy while so many in the world have relatively nothing materially. Here in the states, our poor have a system they can look to as a net to fall back on. Food stamps and state run health care may not be desirable, but is so much more than most may receive globally.
I hope you are feeling better
Mark
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2012
Thank you for your kind words and thoughts, Mark.

Yes, there is nothing to fall back on here, from the state, but the extended family is of great importance in Nepal. Family members support each other as much as they can. However, a poor family here (most of the population ) will struggle with hardship unimaginable to people in more prosperous countries with social welfare and/or other support systems. If you are poor and alone here, it's even worse.

A very common expression here is "Ke garne?",(pronounced Kay gar-nay) "What to do?", people just smile, shrug their shoulders, say, "Ke garne ?, usually make a joke and get on with their lives as best they can.

Their are many in Nepal working to improve the situation here, and some things have improved since I first arrived, but it's a long, long road to travel ... and much more than I can explain here, - as you may well imagine.

Regarding myself, unfortunately, the injuries are permanent, ... "Ke garne ?" ... with a smile.
Namaste, :iconbowplz:
Lindel.
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:iconafricanobserver:
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
You have captured so much, with such respect and warmth and skill.
This is testament to life without consumption, without excess, with dignity.
Thankyou.
Reply
:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2012
Thank you for your kind words. :rose:
Lal Bahadur did indeed live without excess and with dignity but there are some "modern" things he would have welcomed into his life. Please read my reply to Stroody on this page, it explains a little of how life was for Lal Bahadur and for most villagers in Nepal.
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:iconafricanobserver:
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Indeed.
I think I take so much for granted. One can enjoy the fruits of progress without gluttony.

Thank you for taking the trouble to share and respond.
Reply
:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2012
Exactly, no need for excess and waste, happy moderation in life and harmony with our planet is the way. :rose:
I have a feeling you already agree with this way of living.
Reply
:iconafricanobserver:
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
We try!

Technology gives us opportunities to do and achieve many things - like dealing with infant mortality, reducing pain in life, connecting up people who are separated by distance. Used wisely, its great. Used unwisely ...

A sharp knife in the hands of a surgeon is a good thing. In the hands of a gangster, it is a bad thing. Same with technology, or any tool or invention. The evil lies within us too, not only there. May we have the courage to deal with that root cause, before we go jumping up and down elsewhere.

Grace and peace!

Grant H
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2012
Yes,... :rose::nod:
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:iconrcpage:
RCPage Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012
Beautiful Lindel! The photo and text together are very rich.

A new avatar I see...:hug:
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012
Thank you for your kind words, Randall. :hug:
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:iconcprmay:
cprmay Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2012  Professional Photographer
Fantastic, such a portrait speaks a thousand words.... Lovely... :iconwhiteroseplz:
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012
Thank you for your kind words.:iconwhiteroseplz:
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:iconcprmay:
cprmay Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012  Professional Photographer
You are welcome :shamrock:
Reply
:iconn-o-b:
N-o-B Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
How I envy you your adventures! Thanks for sharing your experiences! :D
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012
Thank you, Nils. :rose:
Reply
:iconn-o-b:
N-o-B Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome! :)
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:iconrottenragamuffin:
RottenRagamuffin Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2012   Digital Artist
Gorgeous capture, Lindel, and a wonderful supporting artist statement :heart:
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012
Thank you, Monica. :rose:
Reply
:iconpuken:
puken Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2012
great portrait!
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012
Thank you. :rose:
Reply
:iconcharizfire:
charizfire Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2012
this is wonderful.
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2012
...special in my memories ... :rose:
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:iconlucilaleyla:
LUCILALEYLA Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
What a wonderful capture and story! it warmth my heart :love:
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2012
I'm happy that the fire warms you.:aww:::flame:
Reply
:iconlucilaleyla:
LUCILALEYLA Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
:nod: :huggle:
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:iconstroody:
Stroody Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
An insightful story this but one that doesnt shock nor surprise me - There are still many village people/ tribes that live off the land and have never seen or been in contact with city life/new technology ........ To be honest I admire these type of people , how they do it I just dont know. - Fabulous shot ! :)
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2012
I'm sorry that I have not replied 'til now. I am slightly physically challenged, typing is difficult for me and as your comment needs a longer reply I've not been able to properly respond ...

I'd like to say that I don't mean to shock or surprise, I'm just sharing moments in my life. Lal Bahadur didn't travel far but he would have loved to have electricity or oil lamps and not need to sit in the dark with little wood for his fire. (Due to deforestation). He was curiuos about the modern world but he was also now too old to explore further than his village. He was content, but many of his family had died, mostly children, due to lack of medical facilities near their village. He had endured the pain and loss of most of his teeth over the years, in a cold climate, with no dentists. He accepted all this with an understanding that things change slowly if at all in the villages. At the time this photograph was taken he had a severe cough, he has since passed away, some years ago.

Lal Bahadur's story is not exceptional here in Nepal, where the average life span is 45 years, often less for women, many dying in childbirth. Many children do not reach their fifth birthday. Most villagers' feelings can be exemplified by the following words, "... my dream is for education, a school here at our village. Medical facilities, a health post with a doctor, so we do not die so easily or suffer so much. ... and a better life for my children than mine ... that's all I ask "... during my time here, I've heard this so many times, a constant lament, a constant hope.

Though there is progress in Nepal and many "positive" projects, for most people, much remains the same as it has for hundreds of years. I cannot write more on this here, this is just a little for your understanding. We can admire people living like this, but actually, here in Nepal, where village life is hard, most wish for some "modern" improvements such as I've mentioned above.
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:iconstroody:
Stroody Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks 4 the insight ..... Made good reading :)
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:iconamiejo:
amiejo Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2012
Superbe vraiment, le visage est juste dans le bon éclairage :clap:
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:iconlindelcaine:
LindelCaine Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2012
Merci mon ami. :rose:
Reply
:iconmadrigal-moonlight:
Madrigal-Moonlight Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2012
Another wonderful shot taken by you: You have captured his personality and the atmosphere very well! :clap:
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